Note: This item is more than 11 months old. Please take the publication date into consideration for any date references.

PrintPlain TextPermalink

Media Contact: Rob McCorkle, TPWD, (830) 866-3533 or robert.mccorkle@tpwd.texas.gov; Andy Sipocz, Texas State Parks, (832) 330-2369 or andrew.sipocz@tpwd.texas.gov

Jan. 21, 2014



Jan. 23, 2014 — Update: This news release has been edited to reflect a change in the schedule for the planting. It was originally set for Feb. 6-7, but all planting will take place Feb. 6.

Tree Planting Slated for San Jacinto Battleground Prairie

LAPORTE – Volunteers from the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, Shell Oil Co. and Apache Corporation on Feb. 6 will be planting almost 300 trees at San Jacinto Battleground State Historic Site as part of an ongoing prairie restoration project.

Live oaks, shumard oaks, cedar elms and loblolly pines will be among 280 trees planted on part of the 110-acre of tall-grass prairie being restored to its 1836 look to help visitors visualize the battleground as it would have appeared during the Battle of San Jacinto, which secured Texas’ freedom from Mexico.

The trees will be planted in a 100-yard wide strip within a four-acre area to serve as a visual buffer between the battlefield and neighboring petroleum industry facilities. A similar number of trees will be planted next year to complete a planned seven-acre buffer. Funding for the trees came from Apache Corporation.

The tall prairie grasses and trees were critical to the outcome of the battle, allowing the greatly outnumbered Texans to go undetected in a surprise attack on Gen. Santa Anna’s encamped Mexican force. While portions of the battleground retain the same tall grasses that helped hide Gen. Sam Houston’s Texan troops as they approached on April 21, 1836, the planting area had grown over with Chinese tallow trees and other invasive species.

The new trees will replace the invasive species cleared last fall from portions of the battlefield that was seeded with native grasses and flowers. The restored tall-grass prairie serves as habitat for such prairie-dependent wildlife as marsh hawks and meadow larks, which are often seen by visitors.

The San Jacinto Battleground State Historic Site is a National Historic Landmark and the location of the culminating military event of the Texas Revolution. There is no entry fee for the site and it is open daily 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

2014-01-21


More Information:


Publication — Permission is granted to publish, in whole or in part, any news releases on this page.


Print — A print-friendly version of the news release shows only the release with font sizes set to the browser default.


Plain Text — Plain text versions of TPWD news releases are provided for copying and pasting into editing software.

To copy text into an editing software:

  • Click a Plain Text link to display the plain text page in your browser.
  • Select all.
  • Copy.
  • Paste in a document in your editing program.

Permalink — This is a direct link to the news release, omitting the navigation context from the URI.


English/Spanish — News releases posted in both English and Spanish have one of these links.


If you have any suggestions for improving these pages, send an e-mail to webtech@tpwd.state.tx.us and mention Plain Text Pages.

(5.1.6 i)

Back to Top
Back to Top