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TPWD News, news@tpwd.texas.gov, 512-389-8030

Nov. 10, 2017



Texas State Parks Finally Flaunting Fall Foliage

AUSTIN— Thanks to recent cold fronts, enchanting shades of red, orange and yellow leaves are bursting to life at Texas State Parks statewide.

“This is the perfect opportunity to witness the truly remarkable show Mother Nature puts on in the fall,” said Ky Harkey, director of interpretation for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. “Texas State Parks statewide are filled with color right now giving visitors a unique chance to take fall family photos.”

With this week’s cold snap, several state parks offer opportunities to capture the fall foliage in all its glory.

Just north of Houston, Lake Livingston State Park,  Huntsville State Park, and Martin Dies Jr. State Park have some color beginning to show with the recent weather change, making for prime foliage viewing. In Lake Livingston State Park, the sumac, sweet gum and oak trees have begun to turn, sprinkling shades of yellow and red throughout the pine and hardwood forest of the park.

In the Panhandle plains and mountains of West Texas, the cottonwoods are turning bright yellow, illuminating the landscape at Caprock Canyons State Park and Davis Mountains State Park. The western soapberry and cottonwood trees have been displaying some of the best fall foliage in Caprock Canyons State Park. Less showy, but still eye catching is the Osage orange trees found in the park.

With this weekend’s cold front forecast, Central Texas parks are predicted to have their foliage change in the next several days. Pedernales Falls State Park has an array of tree species turning including post oaks and red oaks which have been exhibiting a vibrant crimson hue. The cedar elm trees are also flaunting their golden leaves.

Lost Maples State Natural Area is known for sporting dazzling displays of fall color and that is the case this year with the leaves increasingly changing each week. The next seven to 10 days will be the showiest before the leaves begin to fall. Most of the maples are in mid color and the canyon walls are aflame with deep reds, oranges and rusts. Old Faithful has also turned auburn and the flameleaf sumacs have burst into red. Many of the Texas oaks and chinkapin oaks have turned to red or brown, while other native trees are turning yellow. Visit the Lost Maples website to view this season’s foliage reports from the park.

Visit a park soon or look for fall foliage photos at your favorite state park’s Facebook page to catch this season’s great fall color.

To see more of Texas State Park’s fall foliage images, visit our Pinterest page.

2017-11-10


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