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|  TPWD News Releases Dated 2018-03-22                                    |
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[ Note: This item is more than six months old. Please take the publication date into consideration for any date references. ]
[ Media Contact: TPWD News, news@tpwd.texas.gov, 512-389-8030 ]
March 22, 2018
Parks and Wildlife Commission Expands CWD Containment Zone in Panhandle
Action Taken in Response to Disease Discovery in Roadkill Whitetail Deer
AUSTIN - The Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission has approved expansion of the state's chronic wasting disease (CWD) Panhandle Containment Zone following the discovery of the disease earlier this year in a roadkill white-tailed deer.
The Containment Zone 2 now encompasses that portion of the state within the boundaries of a line beginning where I.H. 40 enters from the State of New Mexico in Deaf Smith County; thence east along I.H. 40 to U.S. 385 in Oldham County; thence north along U.S. 385 to Hartley in Hartley County; thence east along U.S. 87 to County Rd. 47; thence north along C.R. 47 to F.M. 281; thence west along F.M. 281 to U.S. 385; thence north along U.S. 385 to the Oklahoma state line.
"The decision to expand slightly the Panhandle Containment Zone is a direct result of the test positive roadkill discovery," said Dr. Bob Dittmar, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) wildlife veterinarian. "The state's wildlife disease management response focuses on an early detection and containment strategy designed to limit the spread of CWD from the affected area and better understand the distribution and prevalence of the disease."
The test positive roadkill was among 10,104 deer, elk and other susceptible exotic game animal samples collected from a variety of sources by TPWD personnel for CWD testing during the 2017-18 collection year. In all, TPWD collected 2,203 samples from roadkills, with the rest obtained through mandatory and voluntary hunter harvest submissions.
For the 2017-18 collection season, TPWD surpassed its statewide goal of 6,735 CWD samples. Sampling objectives were established by TPWD wildlife biologists based on deer densities within each of the 41 Deer Management Units in Texas and other factors to establish sufficient confidence of detection if CWD were present within those localized populations.
Since 2012 when the state first discovered the disease among mule deer in a remote mountain area along the New Mexico border, Texas has recorded 100 confirmed cases of CWD. Of those, 64 were discovered in captive deer breeding pens, 11 were hunter harvested on breeder deer release sites, and 2 were elk from a breeder release site. Of the remaining positives, 20 were free-ranging mule deer, 1 was a free-ranging elk and 2 were free-ranging white-tailed deer.
Details about each CWD detection in Texas are available on TPWD's web site.
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[ Note: This item is more than six months old. Please take the publication date into consideration for any date references. ]
[ Media Contact: TPWD News, news@tpwd.texas.gov, 512-389-8030 ]
March 22, 2018
Texas Parks & Wildlife Commission Awards $8.7 Million in Local Park Grants to Texas Communities
AUSTIN-- The Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission approved just over $8 million in competitive local park grants to help fund projects that will create and enhance outdoor recreational opportunities like nature trails, native gardens, playgrounds, splash pads, dog parks and sports fields at 26 community parks across the state.
The grants, allocated to local government entities, appropriate state and federal funding dedicated for the acquisition and/or development of public recreation areas and facilities in Texas on a 50/50 reimbursement match basis. Once funded, all grant assisted sites must be dedicated as parkland in perpetuity, properly maintained and open to the public.
The commission, which administers the local parks grant program for the State of Texas, awarded projects in various categories based on community population size and scope. Urban Outdoor Recreation Grants are reserved for cities having populations exceeding 500,000, with projects in two communities receiving grants. The Non-Urban Outdoor Recreation Grants are dedicated to funding park projects in municipalities under 500,000 and the commission approved awards to projects in 14 communities. The Small Community Recreation Grants are for park projects in towns of less than 20,000 and were awarded to 10 communities.
For more information about the local park grants program, visit the TPWD local park grants page.
The grant funds awarded are listed below by region:
Central Texas
Nolanville will receive a $321,060 non-urban outdoor grant for its city park project to further develop the 10-acre site. Proposed developments include a multipurpose sports field, a basketball and volleyball court, a skatepark, dog park, pedestrian trails with solar lighting, playground equipment, butterfly garden, horseshoe pits, berm seating, washer pits, tetherball, fitness stations and project signage.
Taylor is the recipient of a $500,000 non-urban outdoor grant for the Taylor regional park phase two and Doak Street Park enhancement projects. Proposed developments for the Taylor Regional Park project include the acquisition of 9 acres, installation of lighted soccer fields, walking trails bordered with native plants and educational signage, fishing pier, shaded picnic structures, batting cages and the renovation of an existing football field into a multipurpose sports field. Enhancements to the Doak Street Park project includes a playground.
Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex
Dallas will receive a $1 million urban outdoor grant for its Runyon Creek Greenbelt Trail project. Proposed developments include a hike and bike trail, native landscaping and pedestrian access.
Fort Worth is the recipient of a $1 million urban outdoor grant for phase two of its Alliance Park project. Proposed developments include an acquisition of 114 acres as well as the installation of two soccer fields, a concrete multipurpose trail, pedestrian water crossings, benches, picnic tables, native landscape restoration and interpretive signage.
Grand Prairie will receive a $500,000 non-urban outdoor grant for its Great Southwest Nature Park project. Proposed developments include the acquisition of 68 acres of property to expand the sports complex, as well as a concrete trail, five bridge crossings, five picnic stations, an overlook, fishing pier, boardwalk, recycled crushed concrete nature trail, amphitheater, tall grass prairie construction, wetland enhancement, pavilion, playground, exercise stations, butterfly wildflower garden, wildlife habitat and park information and signage.
Maypearl is the recipient of a $75,000 small community grant for its Wilemon Community Park project. Proposed developments include a playground, looped walking trail, pavilion, fitness stations, demolition of an existing baseball field, signage and professional services.
Olney will receive a $75,000 small community grant project for its park renovation of Tom Griffin Park project. Proposed developments include the removal of obsolete facilities, installation of a modular playground, pour-in place safety surfacing, benches, picnic tables, trash cans, camp grills, shade structure, resurfacing of a basketball court and new backboards.
East Texas
Mount Pleasant is the recipient of a $500,000 non-urban outdoor grant for its sports complex project. Proposed developments include the acquisition of 36 acres of property to expand the sports complex, a lighted competition soccer fields, playground, multipurpose trail, nature trail, pavilion and picnic areas, enhanced nature areas, a pond with enhanced water feature, disc golf, artificial lawn area, native plantings and irrigation and signage.
Naples will receive a $75,000 small community grant for its Naples Park project. Proposed developments include a playground, butterfly garden, walking path and signage.
San Augustine County is the recipient of a $75,000 small community grant for its San Augustin County Children's Park project. Proposed developments include a splash pad and water features, play areas using sustainable elements, fall safety surfaces and ADA entrance mats, pavilion, benches, tables, decomposed granite path, fencing and signage.
Houston
Clear Lake City Water Authority will receive a $500,000 non-urban outdoor grant for its Exploration Green project. Proposed developments include pedestrian trails, site furnishings, landscaping and irrigation.
Harris County Water Control and Improvement District No. 96 is the recipient of a $500,000 non-urban outdoor grant for its sports complex park project. Proposed developments include a land acquisition, concrete trail, fenced dog park, exercise stations with shade, splash pad, tetherball, birdwatching stations, horseshoe pits, picnic stations, washer pits, butterfly garden, benches, ADA swing and playground spinner, rubberized playground flooring, sunshade, volleyball and signage.
Morgan's Point will receive a $500,000 non-urban outdoor grant for its Colonel James Morgan New Washington Prairie project. Proposed developments include the acquisition of 52 acres for the prairie, site work, pedestrian trail and site grading.
Panhandle
Clarendon is the recipient of a $500,000 non-urban outdoor grant for its aquatic center project. Proposed developments include a bathhouse, swimming pool, pool decking and utilities.
Idalou will receive a $75,000 small community grant for its Idalou Park project. Proposed developments include a new skatepark and ballfield renovations.
Levelland is the recipient of a $75,000 small community grant for its Sherman Park project. Proposed developments include renovation and replacement of existing playground equipment at the 4-acre park.
Olton will receive a $213,167 non-urban outdoor grant for its Granberry Park project. Proposed developments include playground equipment, walking trail with fitness stations, pavilion and picnic facilities, basketball court renovation, fencing, benches, fishing dock and bridge and two ADA park entrances.
Stratford is the recipient of a $74,025 small community grant for its Stratford Community Park project. Proposed developments include concrete walking trails, site work and solar lighting.
Wellman will receive a $75,000 small community grant for its Wellman Park project. Proposed developments include easing 0.5 acres from the Wellman-Union Consolidated Independent School District, demolition of old playground equipment and installation of new playground equipment.
Rio Grande Valley
Alton is the recipient of a $500,000 non-urban outdoor grant for its Josefa Garcia Park renewal project. Proposed developments include the acquisition of 14.7 acres, native shade trees, splash pad, multipurpose trail, soccer fields, all abilities playground, shade structure for playground area, solar landscape lighting, water fountains, half basketball court, drip irrigation, rain barrels, native landscaping for pollinator garden, practice field, recycling containers and exercise stations.
Los Indios will receive a $392,020 non-urban outdoor grant for its Del Rio Subdivision Park project. Proposed developments include the acquisition of 2.5 acres, basketball court, fitness area, playground, trails, picnic facilities, benches, solar lighting, native landscaping, hydromulch and irrigation for practice fields, drip irrigation and amenities.
Mission is the recipient of a $500,000 non-urban outdoor grant for its tennis park project. Proposed developments include the construction of 13 new tennis courts, resurfacing three existing tennis courts, creating a pavilion above the basketball court, shaded picnic areas, installation of exercise equipment including three ADA accessible stations, installation of solar lighting, renovation of a walking trail, benches and amenities.
San Benito will receive a $314,780 non-urban outdoor grant for its South Park project. Proposed developments include the acquisition of two city blocks to connect South Park with an adjacent neighborhood, trails, a splash pad, exercise equipment, concession, restroom, picnic tables, lighted soccer fields, barbecue pits, solar lighting, screen planting, hydromulching, fine grading, irrigation and signage.
San Antonio
Universal City is the recipient of a $225,000 non-urban outdoor grant for its Red Horse and Meadow Oaks Parks projects. Proposed developments to Red Horse Park include picnic facilities, a playground, washer pits, pavilion, community tree garden, xeriscape garden, fitness stations, butterfly station and an outdoor classroom. Elements to be included at Meadow Oaks Park include a basketball court, shade structure, shelters and a playground.
Universal City will receive $75,000 small community grant for its Veteran's Park project. Proposed developments include lighted pavilions, picnic facilities, site furnishings, landscaping and project signage.
West Texas
Vinton is the recipient of a $75,000 small community grant for its Mariposa Park project. Proposed developments include the acquisition of 0.52 acres, playground equipment, landscaping and irrigation, site furnishings, picnic facilities, utilities and parking.
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[ Note: This item is more than six months old. Please take the publication date into consideration for any date references. ]
[ Media Contact: TPWD News, news@tpwd.texas.gov, 512-389-8030 ]
March 22, 2018
Texas Game Warden Recognized as National Wild Turkey Federation Wildlife Officer of the Year
AUSTIN-- At Thursday's Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission meeting, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Executive Director Carter Smith recognized Texas Game Warden Carlos Maldonado as the National Wild Turkey Federation's Texas Wildlife Officer of the Year.
Warden Maldonado graduated as part of the 54th cadet class, which was the first class to attend the Game Warden Training Center in Hamilton. Since graduation, Maldonado has served as a game warden for Jim Hogg County for the past nine years.
Maldonado is an active member of his community and works closely with landowners focusing on encouraging youth to be more active outdoors. He organizes and assists with youth hunts on area ranches and attends career days at Hebbronville High School and Bruni High School to promote the game warden recruiting program. Maldonado also serves on the Jim Hogg County Emergency Services District as a board member to assist his community with fire protection and emergency medical services. He also serves the county as a volunteer firefighter.
Maldonado is known by his fellow game wardens as a reliable team member who would drop everything to assist and guide them in anything they need. He will take phone calls from wardens across the state to translate for game wardens speaking to individuals who only speaks Spanish.
He also took the initiative to become a firearms instructor, Glock, M4 and M240B weapons armorer and continuously strives to assist his peers with their firearms proficiency.
Warden Maldonado has assumed the role of deer breeder liaison and assists game wardens in Jim Hogg, Starr and Zapata Counties. He also works closely with various agencies including the Jim Hogg County Sheriff's Office (JHCSO), United States Border Patrol's Hebbronville and Zapata stations, Texas Department of Public Safety Highway Patrol Troopers, Jim Hogg County ISD Police Officers, Jim Hogg County Constables and the Jim Hogg County Volunteer Fire Department.
His relationship with these agencies have led to his involvement in diverse types of cases. Warden Maldonado assists the United States Border Patrol when narcotics smugglers utilize the area ranches to smuggle contraband into our country. He also aids the JHSCO when they are limited to very few patrol deputies. With the JHCSO, Maldonado has helped with domestic violence calls, armed robberies, burglaries and high-speed pursuits.
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