Ranger Notes

Hummingbirds of Lockhart

September 2019

Hummingbird held gently in a person's hand.Worldwide, there are over 300 different species of hummingbirds, 18 of which call the United States home. Half of these species are common in Texas, and the rest are occasional or rare here. Let’s look at what hummingbirds are found around Lockhart, and how attract these gorgeous pollinators to your yard.

Read more Hummingbirds of Lockhart . . . 

 

How Animals Keep Cool During the Summer

August 2019

squirrel stretched out in the shadeSummers in Texas are incredibly hot - beyond hot, even. Most of us can go hang out in some nice cool AC or go for a swim to cool off. What about the wildlife, though? Some wildlife can swim, but they definitely can’t go home to an air-conditioned house. Let’s look at some of the things that our wild neighbors do to keep cool during the height of summer.

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Bat Facts

July 2019

Close-up of batThere are many mis­con­cep­tions about bats and these make many people afraid of them. But there is no reason to fear these little flying mam­mals. Bats are super bene­ficial for us! They help pollinate many kinds of plants, including our crops, and they eat tons of insects every year that would other­wise eat us.

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Baby Animal Help

June 2019

Bird with scruffy feathersThis time of year, many ani­mals have little mouths to feed. From time to time, young ani­mals get sep­a­rated from their parents.  A lot of us are quick to jump into action to help these poor little creatures by taking them in and trying to raise them. Unfortunately, we can be more harmful than helpful.

Read more Baby Animal Help . . . 

 

Monarch Waystation

May 2019

Bed of various wildflowersThe horsemint, Texas star, antelope-horns, firewheels and mealy blue sage are all blooming in the pool garden. This is my favorite garden in the park and my favorite time of year for this garden.

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Your Forest's Imposter

March 2019

Tree draped with mossI love Spanish moss. I’ll admit it. I love how it dangles and sways from the branches of ma­jes­tic trees. I love walking through old growth for­ests that are thick with the stuff. It reminds me of lace draped over the arms of stately ladies.

But Spanish moss is an imposter.

Read more Your Forest's Imposter . . .

Who Took Over Fence Line Trail?

February 2019

leaf cutter ant carrying a pice of leafAs you walk along Fence Line Trail, the elevation changes and the trail dips into a shady and sandy area. When the ground rises back from this spot on the other side, you can see it is covered in brown mounds like large pim­ples. Upon closer in­spec­tion, you see that many little red-brown bodies are marching to and fro amongst the mounds, carry­ing giant leaf pieces over their heads like um­brel­las. You’re looking at one of nature’s earliest and most skilled farmers: leaf cutter ants.

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Forest Bathing

January 2019

shady forest trail

It is Jan­u­ary, and that means New Year’s resolutions. The talk this time of year is usually about exer­cise, doing some­thing good for your body, and in­creasing your well-being. Sound familiar?

Read more Forest Bathing . . .

 

Read 2018 Ranger Notes . . .