Biking

We offer the best biking in Texas, no matter your skill level!

Bike on easy paved park roads, moderately challenging off-road trails, or advanced single tracks. Always wear a helmet. Bring a map and carry enough water, snacks and bike repair equipment. Cell service can be spotty. Ride with a group or let someone know where you will be. For road biking, wear reflective clothing and have lights on your bike. Happy cycling!

Boys riding mountain bikes wearing helmets in McKinney Falls State Park.

Trail ratings

Ratings can help you find the right trail for your skill and comfort level.

State Park trails maps contain lists of most trails with ratings ranging from easy to challenging.

Check Wildlife Management Area web pages for more information on biking at those locations.

Man riding mountain bike down a hill at Dinosaur Valley State Park

Mountain biking in state parks

Ride miles of multiuse (shared with hikers and/or horseback riders) and single-track (biking only) off-road trails in parks across the state. Plan carefully for long or advanced trails. Some trails cross remote backcountry areas. And summer in Texas can be brutal. See trails maps for parks.

Diverse family riding bicycles on a paved road in a Texas state park.

Biking trails in state parks

Beginner trails, whether paved or unpaved, are ideal for families or those trying a new sport. Take your bike for a spin on roads, trailways or multiuse trails in parks. Not all paved roads are easy rides. Ask a ranger for ride recommendations to suit your skills and abilities. See trails maps for parks.

Wildflowers and primitive road at Chaparral Wildlife Management Area.

Biking in Wildlife Management Areas

TPWD manages Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) to study wildlife and habitats. You can bike at many of these locations. You’ll need a Limited Public Use Permit to enter a WMA. Call before visiting and bring your own drinking water. See WMAs with biking.

TPWD Biking Video Playlist

Biking Resources

 


 

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