Federal and State Listed Species of Texas:
Texas Golden Gladecress

Distribution

Current

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Introduced


Distribution map of Texas golden gladecress (Leavenworthia texana).

Scientific Name
Leavenworthia texana
Other Scientific Names
Leavenworthis aurea var. texana
Other Common Names
golden gladecress
Status
Endangered
Global Rank
G1
State Rank
S1

Global Location

Known only from San Augustine and Sabine counties in Texas. A population was introduced into Nacogdoches County, but was reportedly extirpated in 2011 by placement of a pipeline through the site.

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Description

Texas golden gladecress is a 10 cm tall annual with a basal rosette of leaves. The leaf blades are 3.5-5 cm long and are toothed to shallowly lobed. The middle lobe at the leaf tip is wider than long (6-7 mm long, 8-11 mm wide) and larger than the side lobes. The four egg-shaped to tongue-shaped petals are bright yellow (7.3-9 mm long, 2-3 mm wide). The pod-like fruits (1.5-2.3 cm long, 4-5 mm long) are held erect and are slightly constricted between the 5-11 circular seeds.

Texas golden gladecress has toothed to shallowly lobed leaves. The side lobes are smaller than the middle lobe at the leaf tip (which is wider than long). The four petals are bright yellow.

Credit: Jason Singhurst - Texas Parks & Wildlife Dept.

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Similar Species

Texas golden gladecress is not likely to be confused with any other species.

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Floral Characters

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Leaf Characters

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Habitat

Texas golden gladecress occurs on chalky soils over the Weches Formation in glades composed of ironstone or glauconitic (“greensand”) outcrops.

Texas golden gladecress occurs in glades over the Weches Formation.

Credit: Jason Singehurst - Texas Parks & Wildlife Department.

Life Cycle Events

Flowering occurs from February to May.

Survey Season

As an annual, Texas golden gladecress dies back soon after fruiting and re-emerges just before flowering in the early spring. The plant is most easily detected when in flower February to May.

Comments

The glade habitat Texas golden gladecress occupies can fluctuate from being inundated in the winter and spring to being droughty in the summer.This is at least in part due to the presence of glauconite in the soil, a potassium and iron-rich silicate, which has a high water holding capacity. The high fluctuation in water availability decreases the number of species, which can persist in this environment.