Trails Information

Discover Texas history and natural beauty at Fort Richardson.

drawing of a pair of colorful painted buntingsStep back in time to a crossroads of history, culture and nature at Fort Richardson State Park, Historic Site and Lost Creek Reservoir State Trailway. Explore scenic hiking trails within the park, or take the hike, bike and equestrian trailway to Lost Creek Reservoir.

Trails

Lost Creek Reservoir State Trailway allows hiking, biking and equestrian use. All other trails are hiking, only. 

This list may not include all trails in the park.

Trail Distance Difficulty Description
Rumbling Spring Trail 0.5 mi. Moderate Watch your step as you hike this winding, scenic trail to natural springs.
Prickly Pear Trail 1.3 mi. Moderate Look for wildlife as you explore the prairie on this level hiking trail.
Lost Creek Nature Trail 0.5 mi.  Easy Discover Lost Creek on this family-friendly nature trail.
Kicking Bird Trail 0.3 mi. Easy Enjoy a birder's paradise on this loop trail, named after Kiowa chief Kicking Bird.
Lost Creek Reservoir State Trailway 9.0 mi. Moderate Follow Lost Creek on this scenic hiking, biking, and equestrian trail between Fort Richardson State Park & Historic Site and Lost Creek Reservoir.
Oak Ridge Trail 0.4 mi. Moderate Wind through groves of trees on this loop trail between trailhead parking and the shore of Lost Creek Reservoir.
List of Trails

Points of Interest

GPS coordinates shown in decimal degrees.

Point Latitude Longitude Description
Fort Richardson Commissary 30.2080° -98.1607° The wooden section of the commissary was enclosed in 1869 to store extra supplies.
Chicago, Rock Island & Texas Railroad Depot 33.2079° -98.1610° This depot, the first in Jacksboro, operated from 1898 until the 1970s. It's closed, awaiting restoration.
Rumbling Spring 33.2015° -98.1614° Rumbling Spring is like a natural water fountain. Groundwater bubbles up through porous limestone and flows into Lost Creek. 
Flour Mill View 33.2111° -98.1645° The Jacksboro Mill and Elevator Co., built in 1898, is across the creek on private property.
List of Points of Interest

Staying Safe

  • Know your limits. Prepare for sun and heat. Wear sunscreen, insect repellent and appropriate clothing/hiking shoes.
  • Drink plenty of water. Your body quickly loses fluids when you’re on the trail. Bring a quart of water per hour of activity.
  • Tell others where you’ll be. If possible, avoid exploring alone. Tell someone where you are going and when you plan to return.
  • Wear a helmet when biking. Check with park headquarters to match the ride to your skill level. Wear a helmet to protect yourself in case of a crash.
  • Potentially harmful plants and animals may live here. You’ll see them more easily if you stay on trails. Do not approach wildlife!
  • Think before you drink. Water in creeks, ponds, lakes and rivers may not be safe to drink.

Trail Etiquette

  • Trash your trash. Keep the park natural. Pack out all of your trash and Leave No Trace.
  • Leave feeding to nature. Feeding wild animals will make them sick and more likely to harm people.
  • Take only memories and pictures. Please don't disturb or remove any of the park's plants, animals or artifacts.
  • Campfires are permitted only in designated rings and not in the primitive camping area due to the potential for ground scarring and wildfires.  
  • Use only your muscles. To protect park resources, no motor vehicles are allowed on the trails.
  • Share the trail. Hikers yield to equestrians, bikers yield to hikers and equestrians.