Park Alerts...

2020 Fall Foliage Color Report

This report will be updated approximately every week through November. You can also call the park directly for a recorded report at (830)-966-3413, option 3.

For more fall foliage photos, check out Lost Maples on Facebook.

Currently the park is sold out for all day use entry reservations through November 30, 2020, but check online for cancellations.

Nov. 19, 2020

I guess that’s why they call it “fall”; most of the colorful maple leaves are now on the ground, blanketing the trails with an array of colors. Although you will see the red oaks and sumac ablaze with tints of red, the maples have mostly let their leaves go. The leaves that continue to hang on, have lost their luster and are just waiting for the winds to blow them off.

It has been a banner fall season but very short lived. The draught conditions weren’t favorable for many days of the fall color festival.

Currently the park is sold out for all day use entry reservations until November 30, 2020, but check online for cancellations.

TPWD photo taken Nov. 19, 2020.
See a larger version of this photo of the Nov. 19, 2020 fall foliage report. See a larger version of this second photo of the Nov. 19, 2020 fall foliage report. See a larger version of this third photo of the Nov. 19, 2020 fall foliage report.


Nov. 12, 2020

It’s fall y’all! The colors are some of the best we’ve seen in several years; vibrant oranges and reds dotting the hill sides and along the trails. The recent cold front gave the area two mornings of lite frost and adding in abundant sunshine, the leaves responded right on cue. Currently the park is sold out for all day use entry reservations until November 30, 2020, but check online for cancellations.

TPWD photo taken Nov. 12, 2020.
See a larger version of this photo of the Nov. 12, 2020 fall foliage report. See a larger version of this second photo of the Nov. 12, 2020 fall foliage report. See a larger version of this third photo of the Nov. 12, 2020 fall foliage report.


Nov. 5, 2020

The chill of the north winds settled into the Sabinal Canyon over the weekend and reminded the maples it is definitely fall. The trees responded with pops of color throughout the natural area, showing off their yellow, red and orange leaves. Although not quite at their peak, the maples are certainly on their way. The long lasting cool nights and sunny days will keep this fall transformation going for a couple more weeks. 

Most weekends and some weekdays are already fully booked for November. To guarantee entrance, reserve passes online, or by calling the customer service center, before you visit. You can reserve day passes 30 days in advance.

TPWD photo taken Nov. 4, 2020.
See a larger version of this photo of the Nov. 5, 2020 fall foliage report.   


Oct. 29, 2020

Winter came in this week, with lows in the 40s and drizzling rain. This is just what the trees need to start their color change. A good “guesstimate” for peak color is 7-10 days from now. 

TPWD photo taken Oct. 29, 2020.
See a larger version of this photo of the Oct. 29, 2020 fall foliage report.   


Oct. 22, 2020

The summer temperatures and lack of rain just won’t let the fall foliage take over the Sabinal Canyon here at Lost Maples. Though we are starting to see a little fall color along the trails, the majority of the trees and other plant life remain green or showing signs of the draught conditions, except the sumacs; which are scattered throughout the park and the only ones with bragging rights now. Today’s pictures come from the Maple Trail and although the fall colors are not spectacular, the park is still a beautiful place to be.

TPWD photos taken Oct. 22, 2020.
See a larger version of the first photo of the Oct. 22, 2020 fall foliage report.  See a larger version of the second photo of the Oct. 22, 2020 fall foliage report. See a larger version of the third photo of the Oct. 22, 2020 fall foliage report.


Oct. 15, 2020

Fall has finally found the Maples as they start their showy colors. While green is still the majority of the color, we are seeing tinges of yellow, orange and red. 

TPWD photos taken Oct. 15, 2020.
See a larger version of the first photo of the Oct. 15, 2020 fall foliage report.  See a larger version of the second photo of the Oct. 15, 2020 fall foliage report. See a larger version of the third photo of the Oct. 15, 2020 fall foliage report.


Oct. 8, 2020

As we inch closer to the onset of fall colors, the maples remain green despite the lack of rainfall. There are some hints of yellow on the elms and sycamore trees though! 

TPWD photos taken Oct. 8, 2020.
See a larger version of the first photo of the Oct. 8, 2020 fall foliage report.  See a larger version of the first photo of the Oct. 8, 2020 fall foliage report.  


Oct. 1, 2020

As we welcome in October and begin the leaf season here at Lost Maples, so begins the weekly leaf reports. Despite the cooler temperatures this week, the maples, oaks, and elms are still bright green but the overachiever sycamores are starting to show some yellow tint. The dry summer has our rivers and creeks running a little low but the volume of snout-nose butterflies are high, with an even higher chance your vehicle will encounter them on your hill country drive.

TPWD photos taken Sept. 30, 2020.
See a larger version of the first photo of the  Sept. 30, 2020 fall foliage report.  See a larger version of the first photo of the  Sept. 30, 2020 fall foliage report.  


 

Visiting the park in Fall Foliage season

Busy Season

Expect delays, traffic congestion, and capacity closures on fall weekends and the week of Thanksgiving. When parking lots are full, the Natural Area will close. 

To guarantee you get in during our peak season, reserve passes online, or by calling the customer service center, before you visit. . Please check the park Facebook page for immediate updates on closures, or contact the Natural Area.

Park Info

You can drive about one mile into the park to view foliage from your vehicle.

Restrooms and picnic tables are wheelchair accessible. Learn more about accessibility at this park.