Quail in Texas

Quail Facts

Texas is home to four species of quail including the northern bobwhite, scaled quail (Arizona and chestnut-bellied), Gambel's quail, and Montezuma quail (often referred to as Mearn's quail). These small but charismatic birds can be found in almost every region of the state, from the Coastal Plains of south Texas to the northern Panhandle, and west out to the Trans-Pecos. Beyond being one of the most sought after game birds for hunters, quail in Texas are a focal species for many landowners working to restore, maintain, or improve habitat on their properties. The iconic bobwhite whistle is a hallmark throughout Texas in spring and a beacon for wildlife enthusiasts, photographers, and hunters alike. Few, if any, species have galvanized as much attention and resources from our citizens and partners!

  • Cool quail facts video

    Cool Quail Facts

  • Bobwhites on the brink: Texas rangelands video

    Bobwhites on the brink: Texas rangelands

  • grassland restoration for upland birds video

    Grassland Restoration for Upland Birds

  • Hunting Dogs 101 video

    Hunting Dogs 101

  • Quail Research Hunt video

    Quail Research Hunt

  • Wing Shooting Safety video

    Wing Shooting Safety

  • The State of Quail video

    The State of Quail

  • Reversing the Quail Decline in Texas video

    Reversing the Quail Decline in Texas: Wildlife Habitat Federation Model

Quail Management

photo of land plot managed by fire.
photo of land managed by fire.
photo of land managed by fire.

The structure of habitat needed to sustain quail is well documented in Texas. Although the types of plants used by quail will vary across the different regions of our state, the structure of that habitat, which provides nesting, overhead screening, loafing, and roosting cover, remains remarkably similar. With that said, there are different strategies for creating this habitat depending on what part of the state you may reside. .

For more information on how to manage for quail and other wildlife species in your area, contact your local TPWD Biologist.